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Travel to Germany under COVID-19 restrictions

07.04.2022 - Article

New Entry Regulation
As of Thursday, March 3, 2022 at 0:00 a.m., with the enactment of the “Third Amendment to the Coronavirus Entry Regulations, (”Dritte Änderungsverordnung der Coronavirus-Einreiseverordnung“)” no states or regions will be considered high-risk Areas.

The Ordinance Amending on Coronavirus Entry Regulations became effective on 3 March 2022. In terms of content, the rules for entry according to the Ordinance on Coronavirus Entry Regulations remain largely unchanged. The changes affect the definition of proof of recovery and proof of vaccination, the definition of high-risk areas, as well as additional exemptions for children under the age of 12.

  • Proof of recovery: Proof of recovery must comply with the criteria published in section 2 number 8 of the Ordinance on Coronavirus Entry Regulations.
  • Proof of vaccination: The proof of vaccination must also correspond with the criteria pertaining to boosters and the interval periods that must be observed and not exceeded between individual vaccine doses or boosters, for full vaccination protection, as specified in section 2 number 10 of the Ordinance on Coronavirus Entry Regulations.
  • Change in the definition of high-risk areas: From now on, the classification as a high-risk area will only refer to areas with a high incidence with respect to the spread of variants whose virulence – that is, characteristics than can cause sickness – is by comparison higher than that of the Omicron variant. Consequently, the spread of the Omicron variant is no longer a criterion for classifying an area as high-risk.
  • Children under the age of 12: Further relaxation of the quarantine obligation, the requirement to furnish proof, as well as conditions for carriage are envisaged for children under the age of 12.

Entry restrictions and exceptions

Anyone who does not fall under one of the following categories is currently NOT allowed to travel to Germany.

  • German citizens or members of their immediate family (spouses, children under 18, parents of children under 18)
  • EU citizens and citizens of Liechtenstein, Switzerland, Norway and Iceland and the members of their immediate family (spouses, children under 18, parents of children under 18)
  • citizens of non-EU countries who have a current long-term residence permit from an EU or Schengen country and their immediate family members, as long as they comply with passport and visa regulations
  • fully vaccinated people (please see “What rules apply for fully vaccinated people?”) as long as they comply with passport and visa regulations
  • People with important reasons to travel -as long as they comply with passport and visa regulations-, such as:
  • residents of a country who are allowed unrestricted entry into Germany (please see the list of countries here)

If you were vaccinated with Covidshield, please note that your vaccination certificate must contain your passport number or date of birth. Reference to Aadhaar number is not sufficient.

If you have an urgent reason for travel and are vaccinated with Covaxin or any other vaccine not recognised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute, you have to carry a negative PCR test report which is not older than 72 hours on entry in Germany.

Digital entry registration for Germany

Travelers from India no longer need to register at www.einreiseanmeldung.de before departing to Germany, as no country is currently classified as a high-risk area or virus variant area.

Mandatory testing or proof of immunity from COVID-19

From 3 March 2022, every person over the age of 12 is obliged to carry proof of their COVID‑19 status when entering Germany. Persons over the age of 12 must therefore have a negative test result or proof of recovery or vaccination when entering Germany. As a rule, COVID‑19 test results (antigen or PCR tests) must not be more than 48 hours old at the time of the (planned) entry. However, if entering Germany with a carrier (e.g. an airline), PCR tests may be taken a maximum of 48 hours before the (scheduled) start of the journey (e.g. departure time). But antigen tests must not be taken more than 48 hours before the (scheduled) time of arrival in Germany even if travellers are being transported by a carrier.

Travellers who are only transferring at an airport in Germany are also required to present proof of their COVID‑19 status. This applies both to non-Schengen transit from or to third countries outside the EU and to transit from or to Schengen states.

The negative test result, proof of recovery or proof of vaccination must be shown to the carrier for examination prior to departure. Only in the case of cross-border rail travel or cross-border short sea transport may the relevant documentation be presented during transit. Proof must also be shown to the German border authorities upon entry if requested.

Travellers entering Germany from areas of variant of concern must present a negative PCR test result: in this case a rapid antigen test or proof of recovery or vaccination is not sufficient. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the (scheduled) start of the journey. Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers to take additional PCR tests after entering the Federal Republic of Germany, in particular at their point of arrival (e.g. at the airport).

Cross-border commuters are only required a negative test or proof of immunity after a stay in a high risk area, in an area of variant of concern or when entering Germany by air travel. In these cases a new negative test only needs to be provided twice per week.

In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high-risk area or area of variant of concern or who are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, a new negative test only needs to be provided twice per week.

More detailed information is available on the Website of the Federal Ministry of Health.

Requirements for tests and proof of vaccination or recovery

In principle, the following forms of proof are accepted:

Proof of a negative test result:

A negative test result obtained using nucleic acid amplification technology (e.g. PCR, PoC- PCR) in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish. The test must have been carried out no more than 72 hours prior to entry (time of swabbing).

Alternatively, a negative antigen rapid test result in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish. Following a stay in a high-risk area, the test must have been carried out no more than 48 hours prior to entry. Following a stay in an area of variant of concern, the test must have been carried out no more than 24 hours prior to entry.

Details on the recognition of tests are provided on the website of the Robert Koch Institute. 

Proof of vaccination:

Proof of vaccination against COVID-19 in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish in digital or paper form (e.g. EU Digital COVID certificate; WHO vaccination booklet). Note that a photo of a proof in paper form is not sufficient.

The vaccination must have taken place with one or different vaccines approved by the European Union with at least two doses. In countries outside the European Union equivalent vaccines may be used. A list of these vaccines is available here

A single dose of vaccine is sufficient only if:

  • an antibody test with proven infection with coronavirus prior to the vaccination, followed by administration of vaccination; or
  • a positive test by means of a nucleic acid test (for example, PCR) prior to the vaccination dose ; or

  • a positive test by means of a nucleic acid test (for example, PCR) taken at least 28 days ago and after first vaccination dose was administered;

The proof of vaccination must contain:

- personal data of the person vaccinated (at leat surname, first name(s) and birth date or number of passport / ID

- date and number of vaccinations

- name of the vaccine used.,

- name of the illness against which the person was vaccinated.

- characteristics that allow to identify the person of institution that was responsible for the vaccination or the issuance of the certificate, such as an official seal Symbol or name.

- where necessary: details on booster vaccinations and the corresponding date.

These requirements for vaccinations are in force until 30 September. From 1 October as a rule three doses of vaccine will be required.

Proof of recovery:

A positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days previously. Detailed requirements are availble on the website of the Robert-Koch-Institute.

Entry to Germany for fully vaccinated persons

Persons who are fully vaccinated against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 with vaccines approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) (or equivalents of these vaccines used in third countries) can enter Germany. This includes persons who wish to enter Germany for the purpose of visits or tourism. Fully vaccinated persons as defined above can apply for visas at the competent mission abroad if required.

However, this does not apply to entry to Germany from countries that are classified as areas of variant of concern. Transportation to Germany from these areas continues to be prohibited.

Only persons who are fully vaccinated with one or different vaccines approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) (list of approved vaccines here) or with equivalents of these vaccines used in third countries (list here) can enter Germany. The plan is to extend this to other vaccines with a comparable level of protection as soon as the necessary tests have been completed.

To enter Germany, all travellers must present proof of vaccination that meets the requirements listed under 1., 2. and 3. below in full.

  1.  It must be a digital EU COVID certificate or comparable proof of vaccination in digital or physical (paper) form in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish. Photographs of paper records cannot be accepted as digital proof. Proof in digital form should have been issued digitally by the authorised issuer and transmitted digitally to the entitled holder.
  2.  Proof of vaccination must contain the following information:
    1.  the personal data of the vaccinated person (at least their family name, first name and date of birth or the number of a valid passport or other official photo ID, which is to be presented upon inspection),
    2. date of vaccination, number of vaccinations,
    3. name of vaccine,
    4. name of disease vaccinated against, and
    5. identifiers that indicate the person or institution responsible for administering the vaccination or issuing the proof of vaccination, for example an official symbol or the name of the issuer.
  3.  Furthermore, the vaccination needs to meet certain requirements as provided for in Section 22 (a) 1 of the Protection against Infection Act for the individual to be considered fully protected. To be considered fully vaccinated with approved vaccines, the requirements are
    1.  up until 30 September 2022: two vaccination doses;
    2. up until 30 September 2022: one vaccination dose if in addition the individual can provide proof of:
      1.  an antibody test with proven infection with coronavirus prior to the vaccination, followed by administration of vaccination; or
      2.  a positive test by means of a nucleic acid test (for example, PCR) prior to the vaccination dose ; or
      3. a positive test by means of a nucleic acid test (for example, PCR) taken at least 28 days ago and after first vaccination dose was administered;
    3. from 1 October 2022: three vaccination doses; the last vaccination dose must be administered at least three months after the second one;
    4. from 1 October 2022: two vaccination doses if proof can be provided in addition of:
      1.  an antibody test with proven infection with coronavirus prior to the first vaccination dose, followed by administration of two vaccinations; or
      2. a positive test by means of a nucleic acid test (for example, PCR) prior to the second vaccination ; or
      3.  a positive test by means of a nucleic acid test (for example, PCR) taken at least 28 days ago and after the second vaccination was administered.

Before you travel, please check your vaccination certificate meets the above requirements.

Children under the age of 12 who are not yet vaccinated can enter the country with proof of a negative test result (PCR test or antigen test) when accompanied by at least one fully vaccinated parent. Children under the age of six do not require proof of a negative test result.

Further information is available here.

Quarantine regulations

With effect from 03 March, no country is considered a high-risk area anymore. Therefore, quarantine is no longer required upon arrival in Germany.

Covid-19 restrictions on public life in Germany

Please note that from now on the so-called “2G” regulation applies in many parts of Germany.

This means that access to accommodations, restaurants and events is only possible for those who are fully vaccinated or have recovered from COVID.

Additionally, it may be required to show a negative COVID test (“2G+”).

At this point, people vaccinated with Covaxin do not count as vaccinated at all, since this vaccine is not yet recognised by the German Paul Ehrlich Institute.  

Only digital vaccination certificates recognised in Germany (Digital Covid Certificates according to EU regulations) are generally accepted.

You may therefore be denied access to events or facilities if you only have an Indian vaccination certificate.

Your travel plans may be affected. Please check in advance weather you can travel under the new restrictions by contacting your host or checking the website of the event that you are planning to attend.


Watch out for local regulations

Measures for fighting the spread of COVID-19 are subject to local regulation.

The international advice on reducing the spread of COVID-19 should be followed. This includes washing hands regularly and thoroughly with soap for 20-30 seconds, sneezing into the elbow or the quick disposal of handkerchieves or tissues, keeping a distance from other people and avoiding shaking hands. Further information and details can be found on the World Health Organization’s website

Where possible, travel should be reduced and public transport avoided to further reduce the risk of infection.


Where to find more information

More information is available from the following institutions:

Information on coronavirus and regulations in English and other languages

Ministry of the Interior

Ministry of Health

Ministry of Transport

World Health Organization

Robert Koch Institute


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