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Development Partnership with the Private Sector

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Development Partnerships with the Private Sector (DPP) are cooperation projects between BMZ (implemented by GIZ, DEG or Sequa) and the private sector. Development partnerships combine the innovative power of business with the resources, the knowledge and experience of development work. .

Germany's development policy uses develoPPP.de to mobilise additional capital and know-how from the private sector. Companies create jobs, secure incomes, transfer technical knowledge and introduce forward-looking technologies, so they play an effective role in improving living conditions in developing, emerging and transition countries

Development Partnerships with the Private Sector (DPP), also known as Public Private Partnerships (PPP), is the cooperation between official development cooperation and the private sector. With its DPP strategy, the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) intends to strengthen the concerted action of official development cooperation and private business activity. Its main goals are the mobilisation of additional contributions from the private sector, the utilisation of private management know-how with a view to more efficient service delivery, and the promotion of private-sector investment as a growth engine for our partner countries' development process. Development Partnerships with the Private Sector are thus not only in the interest of the enterprises concerned, they also generate added value from a development point of view.

BMZ set up a separate fund for development partnerships with the private sector in 1999 (PPP Facility). In 2009 it was restructured and renamed to the develoPPP.de programme. Projects financed from develoPPP.de are implemented jointly by the enterprise concerned and by one of the following implementing agencies: GIZ , DEG and SEQUA
GIZ: www.giz.de/Themen/en/2362.htm

The promotion of training programmes on technical and financial skills is one significant segment of DEG's activities under DPP. German Companies use the respective funding facility to train school graduates and jobless people in accordance with their own requirements. The programmes are assigned to provide solid fundamentals and expertise for which there also is demand in the Indian job market in general. One major prerequisite for funding (in general at least 50% portion of total project costs to be borne by the German Company) is the number of participants in the courses which shall exceed the German Company's staff requirement by far.

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